Postmortem: GGJ 2014 and Negative Space

This past weekend I participated in Global Game Jam 2014 at the NYU Game Center. It was my first time competing in a jam of this size and scope, so when I showed up at 5pm on Friday 1/24 I had no idea what to expect. Amazingly enough, I was one of 279 jammers at Game Center, making it the biggest jam site in North America (5th biggest in the world)!

The crowd was electric when the keynotes began, and the atmosphere quickly shifted to one of wonder and suspense as the words of Jenova Chen, Kaho Abe, and Richard Lemarchand gave sound advice and hinted at the kind of theme that was about to be unveiled. And then, by accident, it was very suddenly revealed on the projector:

“We don’t see things as they are, but as we are.”

The Global Game Jam experience

I quickly teamed up with artist David Wallin and programmer Altay Murat, with the intent of creating a game using the Phaser HTML5  Game Framework. Our plan was to get a barebones working prototype by the end of Friday night, but this jam ended up being very different from my past experiences.

In past jams, my makeshift team would settle on an idea very quickly (in less than 1 hour),and begin working on a prototype right away. There would be a great deal of overscoping, and we would wait too long to drop unnecessary features. Throw in some heavy sleep deprivation, and by Sunday we would be exhausted and stressed beyond belief.

But this jam was backward. We spent the entire Friday evening going back and forth on possible directions before finally settling on an idea. But from that point onward it because easier and easier. David is a phenomenal artist and Altay is an excellent programmer, so our workflow was very smooth. Every few hours we would re-evaluate our situation, adjust the scope if necessary, assign tasks, and continue. By early afternoon on Saturday, our core mechanic was implemented and FUN.

One helpful difference was that the NYU Game Center closed at midnight on Friday and Saturday, preventing us from pulling all-nighters. This forced us to get some much needed sleep, which made all of the difference in our focus, communication, and motivation.

Negative Space

Our efforts resulted in a game called Negative Space, which you can check out right here. It was nominated for “Best Use of Theme!!”

**IMPORTANT: If you do not want our theme interpretation to be spelled out for you, play the game before reading on!!**

NegSpace_screen2

Negative Space is a commentary on the different world views of the introverted and the extroverted. Players take the role of two characters in a social scenario and control the simultaneously with the arrow keys. On the left, the introvert dislikes overstimulation through engagement, and prefers to have space. On the right, the extrovert gets energy from engagement with others, and prefers to be around other people. The goal of the game is to fill up both characters’ happiness meters by catering to their preferences.

Mechanically, the game is about coordinated movement. Since you are avoiding on the left and chasing on the right, you need to analyze the flow of the crowd and constantly make small adjustments to both characters’ positions. Most players loved the challenge of playing two characters at once, but a few felt it was too stressful. People in the crowd move randomly in the early levels, but later take on different simple movement behaviors (ie: Seek, Avoid, etc.).

Level Design Aesthetics

As the game’s Level Designer, I really enjoyed using the mechanics to paint different aesthetic scenarios. For example, in one scenario the Introvert is surrounded by 10 different Seekers. Inevitably, as player weaves in and out, the seekers coalesce into a mob formation, which feels very intimidating and forces the Introvert to always be on the run.

In another scenario, the Extrovert is surrounded by 25 Avoiders. The result is a wave-like radius organically forming around you, as if you truly do not belong at the party. Fittingly, the dominant strategy here is to pin a poor soul in the corner, which many players said “felt wrong”. Even better, this same strategy also puts the Introver safely in the corner, where he can easily hide from social interactions.

I would have loved to have explored these ideas further by implementing and playing with other kinds of movement behaviors, but such is the nature of a game jam.

Playtesting

Watching people play Negative Space was pure joy. We made a bold move in not explicitly stating the concept of the game, which made it that much more satisfying to witness the “Aha!” moment first hand. There were many moments where people would be playing, figuring out the properties and differences between the introvert and the extrovert, when suddenly it would click and they would exclaim “Oh I get it! It’s an introvert and an extrovert!!”

I also really enjoyed collecting and consolidating feedback. Although I am inexperienced, I feel like I have a natural ability to interpret feedback (even when it is not constructive), and ask the right questions to get them thinking and articulating their thoughts and frustrations in a clear and useful way. Or maybe it’s just luck… but I really enjoy the process and I cannot wait to dive deeper into the process and become a better designer.

Final Thoughts

Global Game Jam 2014 may just be my favorite jam yet! The environment, the energy, the scope and theme… it is just awesome and epic and gets my creative juices flowing in a really satisfying way.

I can’t wait to do it all over again for GGJ 2015! But this time… in Boston. 🙂

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