Brain and Brawn – Dev Log #1: Boston FIG

This post is a breakdown of our experiences leading up to FIG, our experience on the show floor, and our next steps.

The Lead Up

Before we could figure out long term goals, we had an immediate short term goal. The Boston Festival of Indie Games was in 3 weeks, and since I had submitted my browser demo in June we were scheduled to be on the floor. But I was tired of showing a mobile game concept on a desktop browser. We needed to get it on the target platform.

The initial goal: To prepare a working mobile demo, complete with touch controls and at least 15 strong mobile levels, for Boston FIG on Saturday 9/13.

What did that mean? How did that goal break down into objectives?

The Breakdown:

  • Wrapping – We needed to figure out how to get our demo working properly on a phone. Do we rely on the mobile web, or a wrapper app such as CocoonJS or PhoneGap?
  • Resizing – The game needed to move from 800×690 pixels the iPhone 4 resolution of 600×960, and the the tiles needed to increase from 40×40 to 64×64 to be more visible.
  • Touch controls – The player should be able to tap to select buttons and progress through menus, and swipe in cardinal directions to move Brainy and Brawny
  • Art – Instruction screens needed to be reformatted to fit the mobile screen ratio.

This was ambitious on its own, but there was one extra challenge. Moving to a smaller screen resolution while increasing the size of the sprites meant a drastic shift from 320 tiles (20×16) to 150 tiles (10×15). A 53% decrease in level design real estate. If I wanted to have good levels, I knew that I needed a full week of dedicated level design, which meant that I needed to have all of the other features implemented in just two weeks.

But even though it was a scary amount of work to be doing in just evenings and weekends, especially factoring in a move into a new apartment… we pulled it off and had lots of fun doing it! By BFIG we had 16 strong levels that were hand-designed for a newly resized game, all wrapped in CocoonJS and working smoothly with touch screen controls.

Postmortem: Showing the Game at BFIG

Showing Brain and Brawn at Boston FIG was an awesome experience. About 80 people stopped by our booth and played our game, and 33 of them signed up for our mailing list. The overall reception was very positive, and we learned a lot!

Boston FIG

Some of the things we learned:

  1. Everyone plays, thinks, and learns differently. That may sound obvious, but seeing it in action was something else entirely. Swipes ranged from fast to slow, exaggerated to subtle, sloppy to precise, and long to short. Different approaches included trial-and-error, waiting and strategizing, and a combination.
  2. There is no replacement for raw data. Of a sample of ~80 people, an overwhelming majority of players stopped on one of two levels: 8 and 14. We knew that the difficulty curve wasn’t perfect, but to see such massive spikes was enlightening. It was also frustrating because we couldn’t do anything about it mid-show! It would be tedious for sure, but putting analytics in place could do wonders for our game design.
  3. Players won’t assume that your game has depth. The moment that aliens are first introduced (level 6) is an eye-opening moment for players, because the possibility space opens up significantly, and players suddenly want to keep playing to discover more mechanics. If a player believes that they’ve grokked the possibility space before getting to level 6, then they will write off your game without ever knowing how far it can go.
    (Interesting Note: Fast grokking is fine as long as actual proficiency rises just as fast or faster… in other words a good puzzle player will zoom to level 6 so fast that grokking beforehand is a non-issue.)
  4. Kids rule! Some of my favorite moments involve watching younger kids pick up the game, smile when they “get it”, ignore their impatient parents who wanted to move on, and fully commit to beating the very last level. Equally awesome were the parents who actively participated in the experience, weighed in on tougher levels, and encouraged them to do their very best.
  5. There is no easy way to communicate that development on your game has only just begun, and saying it explicitly comes off as an excuse. I would have thought that the lack of polish made it obvious… but instead the average person thought it was already complete! Either they loved the puzzles and wanted to buy it, or they were thoroughly disappointed with the visuals/graphics and asked us to do better next time. O_o

And that’s just the start of it. We actually learned even more, but it would take forever for me to list it all out!

What’s next?

The next step is actually to take a step back! We crunched for FIG, but now we want to look at the bigger picture and figure out our long term development plan. David and I have set a target of Q1 2015 release, with hopes of getting the meat of the work done by January. We scoped out what features we thought were realistic, and now it’s time to restructure our code to be more accommodating of future growth spurts and major changes.

It’s a slower time for sure, but it won’t be long until we are once again pushing hard for our next major milestone. We’ll keep you updated on cool things as they get closer, but in the  meantime it’s just great to be working on indie games again. 🙂

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